From Time immemorial its been learnt that Cavemen decorated their caves with paintings and adorned themselves with jewelry made of bones, feathers and stones. Humans always looked to Nature’s resources not only for survival but also for creating beautiful interiors to dwell in. Each person’s home has always been their castle, their haven and their refuge; a personal universe.

What is there to appreciate if not beauty? Why is it that every article of furniture that has a use cannot be exquisite and made with the finest craft? What machines can make the turns, curves and engraved motifs and inlay work that human hands can? The question is rhetorical.

Beauty lives within the human soul, its conceptualization takes place in the mind and its expression springs forth in the form of design, structure and form in every man-made object each influencing the next mind and the next work of art or craft.

In works from the olden times, we see the form and motifs of the prevalent cultural tenor and architecture of the time. The Jhoolas, Modas, Altars, etc are reminiscent of the pillars, brackets,

Yalis, Rakshakas and domes of the temples and notable structures of those days.

Ancient mythology and its significance is evidenced in the application of particular symbols and motifs to specific objects. Most types of furniture was delicately adorned with motifs of Nature’s abundance and these were clearly products of fine dastakaars with well-honed skills. They would have spent their days toiling at these works, stooped over, chisel and hammer in hand, to bring to life the exquisite mystique and beauty of unique one-of-a-kind pieces of traditional furniture.

Each a work of art. Each a treasure. A blessing.